Resources Library

Healing and Repairing – Re-Imagining Conservation From Where Our Lives Intersect

2016

Maine Coast Heritage Trust

Details

Healing and Repairing is a joint project with Maine Coast Heritage Trust to offer observations on a moment when much is evolving in the relationship between people and place in Maine, and to share an essay that respectfully stretches and encourages the hearts and minds of those who care about both. The audience for this essay is people everywhere who think, work and devote their lives to healthy soils, forests, oceans and people. This is a story mostly about Maine; hopefully people from other places will be able to see themselves and their situations within this story.

Call to Action Item #22 – Scaling Up: 2011-2016 Accomplishments Report and Next Steps

2016

National Park Service

Details

This report provides an overview and successes of C2A Item 22, and also includes invited papers from multiple authors that illustrate the truly collaborative nature of this endeavor as well as next steps as move for-ward into the NPS second century of stewardship and conservation of our nation’s protected lands and waters.

National Park Service Natural Resource Stewardship and Science Framework – Four pillars to guide natural resource activities and investments

September 2016

National Park Service

Details

This framework identifies broad priorities and focus areas for NPS investments and activities in natural resource stewardship and science that can be managed toward clear outcomes and evaluated for progress, effectiveness, and efficiencies. A major focus for the NPS is management of park natural resources across the system on a day-to-day basis. This daily management or “holding the line” will always be core to the NPS. Long-term success means both focusing on day-to-day needs and investing in stewardship and science in dynamic critical areas to ensure the NPS is managing for change, leveraging conservation at scale, and enhancing science, stewardship, and engagement.

Adapting to Change in the Crown of the Continent: An Ecosystem Scale Approach to Collaborative Management

2015

Roundtable on the Crown of the Continent

Details

The Crown Roundtable was created to bring all stakeholders in the ecosystem together–the tribes, the working lands owners, business leaders, local officials, conservationists, universities and colleges, and the region’s young people. All these communities of actors were connected to the landscape, but not to each other. The Roundtable serves as the connective tissue to assist this diverse network in addressing the challenges of the change we are all experiencing. As part of the Roundtable’s work, we collectively designed an experiment to implement one of the first large scale climate adaptation efforts–known as the Adaptive Management Initiative (AMI). Our goal was to build a support network to help communities work together to adapt to change. This primer, Adapting to Change in the Crown of the Continent: An Ecosystem Scale Approach to Collaborative Conservation shares the Roundtable’s stories and lessons from our innovative work. We believe it gives hope for other diverse communities who seek a path forward in a world struggling with immense change.

Turf, Trust, Co-creation and Collective Impact

September 2017

Tamarak Institute

Details

Authentic community change moves at the speed of trust. And yet, we spend so little time and focus on intentionally building trust amongst partners. This paper explores the intricacies of trust, how to build it and what to do when trust is broken.

Capacity Building for Collaboration

November 2018

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Key Findings: Capacity Building for Collaboration Case Study

January 2019

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Additional Research Support for Capacity Building for Collaboration Case Study Findings

January 2019

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Steven Mietz named Redwood National & State Parks superintendent

September 21, 2017

National Park Service

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The National Park Service has named Steven Mietz superintendent of  Redwood National & State Parks. He is currently the superintendent of Great Basin National Park in Nevada. Mietz replaces Steven Prokop who retired earlier in the year.

United States Withdrawal from UNESCO Implications for the Man and the Biosphere program

October 12, 2017

UNESCO

Details

The Secretary of State has made the decision to withdraw from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and to seek to establish a permanent observer mission to the organization.

Land for Life – Stewardship Toolkit

2014

Land for Life

Details

Land Stewardship Toolkit – Basic tools for land stewardship organisations in Europe

Forming and Sustaining Regional Stewardship Collaborations: Lessons Learned

August 2017

California Council of Land Trusts

Details

To develop this document, over 35 land trust and agency representatives were interviewed and some also made presentations as part of CCLT’s Regional Stewardship Symposium in March 2017. Each had stories to tell about collaborative stewardship, observations on its benefits and challenges, and advice on starting and sustaining a collaboration. These stories and words of wisdom have been distilled into fourteen lessons learned that land trusts can apply to strengthen existing collaborations and promote new ones in order to improve land management and stewardship outcomes.

Landscape Stewardship Guide

September 2011

Northeastern Area Association of State Foresters and U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service

Details

This document provides you and other Cooperative Forestry program managers with broad guidance on a landscape approach to forest stewardship in the region served by Northeastern Area State and Private Forestry. This approach has strong potential to increase our ability to sustain the benefits that both society and individuals derive from privately owned forest land by engaging landowners and their communities in its management. Landscape stewardship can help keep forests as forests.

How to Develop a Common Agenda for Collective Impact – A 5-Step Guide

September 2017

Tamarack Institute

Details

Building a common community agenda is fundamental to all community change requiring a collective impact. It is, however, one of the most difficult phases of a community change process, and if done incorrectly will cripple effectiveness as a community moves to implement its collective impact plan.

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