Resources Library

A repository of resources and knowledge on the practice of landscape conservation.
To search the Library, use the dropdown menu to select a category and then click the green “Explore” button. Alternatively, the library can be searched directly by clicking over to the “Search” tab and entering a keyword.

Explore the library and return regularly to stay up-to-date on the newest resources and knowledge informing the practice of landscape conservation—our hope is that this Library is a valuable knowledge base that empowers you and your fellow practitioners to accelerate your work, build capacity within the field, and achieve on-the-ground conservation success.

Pathways Forward: Progress and Priorities in Landscape Conservation

August 2018

Network for Landscape Conservation

Details

Pathways Forward captures the insights of 200 conservation leaders from the U.S., Canada, and Mexico who convened for two days in November 2017 at the National Forum on Landscape Conservation to strategize on the rapidly growing practice of collaborative conservation at the landscape scale. The report assesses the state of the field, showcases many innovative examples, and recommends ways to further advance this transformative conservation approach—together and in our own landscapes. The report is comprised of five chapters that explore various elements of landscape conservation: collaboration; communication and engagement; science and planning; finance and funding; and policy. Each chapter concludes with a series of five-year Benchmarks, that serve as forward-looking and aspiration targets for the landscape conservation field.

Santa Cruz Mountains Stewardship Network: A Regionwide, Cross-Sector Approach to Conservation

2017

Author: Matthew Spence, Converge for Impact

Details

This publication presents a case study of the first two years of an emergent landscape conservation initiative the Santa Cruz Mountains Stewardship Network – the obstacles that were encountered and overcome, the lessons learned, and the challenges ahead. Interwoven throughout the case study are frameworks, tools, and insights that are broadly applicable across all contexts.

Rather than forming the network around a clearly-defined purpose and a set of measurable objectives, the the Santa Cruz Mountains Stewardship Network followed a network formation process from 2014 to 2016 that allowed outcomes to emerge from a process that emphasized cultivating strong trust-based relationships between participants, facilitating the right conversations, and implementing necessary leadership, organizational structures, and decision-making processes as the network evolves. The result has been the emergence of The Santa Cruz Mountains Stewardship Network as a collaboration of nineteen federal, state, and county agencies, land trusts, nonprofits, research institutes, a Native American tribal band, and a timber company, that works to improve land stewardship in the Santa Cruz Mountains region south of San Francisco.

Conservation by Design: A strategic Framework for Mission Success

2015

The Nature Conservancy

Details

This report lays out the adaptive management cycle that The Nature Conservancy has adopted to integrate analyses of where to work and how to accomplish its work. The report highlights the interdependence of social and natural systems, and aims to create virtuous cycles between people and nature within those integrated systems. Presented as a guide to practitioners, the principles of TNC’s Conservation by Design approach and uses case studies to bring these principles to life.

Also see TNC’s Conservation by Design web-platform

Conservation Finance Toolkit

2018

Author: Conservation Finance Network

Details

The Conservation Finance Toolkit is a resource explaining tools and techniques available to conservation-finance practitioners. Tools covered vary from the simple to the complex. Each writeup contains an example of the technique in practice.

Resilient and Connected Landscapes for Terrestrial Conservation

2016

Authors: Mark G. Anderson, Analie Barnett, Melissa Clark, Arlene Olivero Sheldon, John Prince and Barbara Vickery

Details

This report by The Nature Conservancy brings together resilience, permeability, and diversity to develop a connected network of sites that both represents the full suite of geophysical settings and has the connections and networks necessary to support the continued rearrangement of species in response to change.

Check out TNC’s Resilient and Connected Landscapes web-platform.

Conservation Finance: Moving beyond donor funding toward an investor-driven approach

2014

Authors: Fabian Huwyler, Jürg Käppeli, Katharina Serafimova, Eric Swanson, and John Tobin

Details

To preserve the health of natural ecosystems, a significantly larger amount of capital investment is required than the sums currently being allocated to conservation. Private sector investment is needed, not to replace but to supplement traditional sources of conservation capital such as public funding or philanthropy, which have been impacted by the global economic downturn. Against this backdrop, WWF and Credit Suisse have joined forces in the area of conservation finance to iden- tify the conditions needed to attract and redirect private capital toward conservation.

This report shows that there are many unexploited private sector investment opportunities to increase conservation finance and deliver maximum conservation impacts while, at the same time, generating returns for investors. In order to develop appropriate financing structures and ensure that private sector conservation finance results in measurable conservation outcomes, financial institutions and non-governmental organizations must experiment and define their respective roles and approaches. If both sides concentrate on their main areas of expertise – with banks focusing on the alignment of capital resources, risks, and maturities, while NGOs identify measures to protect the natural environment – we can create a new opportunity for collaboration that will help to preserve natural capital for future generations. Provided it delivers measurable results, investor-driven conservation finance can create powerful incentives for truly sustainable development.

Perspectives on Collaborative Conservation: Lessons Learned from the Greater Sage Grouse Collaboration

2018

Authors: Partners for Conservation

Details

Collaboration and partnerships between 2010 and 2015 have been recognized as a key reason the greater sage grouse was kept off the federal endangered species list. Partners for Conservation undertook an explored this unprecedented collaboration  in an effort to draw lessons from the successes and challenges of the process. Based on interviews with more than 40 individuals that were actively involved in the sage grouse collaboration efforts, this report presents a synopsis of the various responses and identifies primary themes that emerged across perspectives. By identifying what worked well–and where the greatest challenges emerged–the report aims to distill lessons that can be broadly applicable across contexts in helping guide collaborative conservation on future natural resources challenges.

Facilitating Local Stakeholder Participation in Collaborative Landscape Conservation Planning: A Practitioners’ Guide

2018

Authors: Catherine Doyle-Capitman and Daniel J. Decker

Details

This document provides guidance on integrating local stakeholder participation and social data into collaborative landscape conservation (CLC) planning. This Guide draws on empirical analysis of current collaborative landscape conservation initiatives to highlight how local stakeholders and social data have been used in a range of landscape conservation planning efforts. We share insights regarding local stakeholders’ preferences for participation in collaborative landscape conservation planning and some of the undesirable impacts resulting from not considering social data or local stakeholders’ input during these planning efforts. We offer a process model indicating when and how local stakeholder participation and social data might be usefully integrated during collaborative landscape conservation planning. We close the Guide by examining resources that those responsible for developing collaborative landscape conservation planning products might draw on to find existing social data and how they might collect new data from local stakeholders. We believe guidance provided in this document can help foster effective landscape conservation planning by increasing local stakeholders’ investment in collaborative landscape conservation planning processes and products and their sense of ownership over conservation decisions and outcomes.

Conservation Innovation in Context

2013

Authors: The Aspen Institute and the Chesapeake Conservancy

Details

In May 2013, the Aspen Institute and the Chesapeake Conservancy partnered to host a Conservation Innovation Roundtable to discuss challenges currently facing conservation organizations and promising technology and techniques that could help bridge some of these gaps. Over the course of two days, thirty-five experts in the fields of conservation targeting, remote sensing, communications and conservation finance focused discussion on four main topic areas: 1) Conservation in Context – From Global to Local, 2) Innovative Tools for Public Engagement in Conservation, 3) New Financing Models for Conservation, and 4) Technology – Remote and On-the-Ground Sensing. The discussion resulted in five key observations: (1) There is a tremendous amount of potential for conservation innovation to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of local, state and federal conservation programs as well as non-profit organizations; (2) Large-landscape initiatives require local partners; (3) Public demand and support is critical to the success of conservation initiatives; (4) To be effective ecosystem markets and regulations must accurately prove they have improved over-all ecosystem health; and (5) Ecosystem markets that accurately reflect the impact of conservation and restoration will lead to an influx of private capital. This report details these five observations and more from the roundtable discussions.

Large Landscape Conservation: A Strategic Framework for Policy and Action

2010

Authors: Matthew McKinney, Lynn Scarlett, and Daniel Kemmis

Details

In response to increasing activity at the landscape scale, leaders from the public, private, and nongovernmental sectors participated in two national policy dialogues and many other informal discussions in 2009. This report seeks to bridge the gap between theory and practice by combining research findings and case studies with the insights emerging from these policy dialogues to synthesize what we know about landscape conservation and to identify the most important needs as we move forward.

The Science of Strategic Conservation: Protecting More with Less

May 2018

Authors: Kent D. Messer and William L. Allen III

Details

Billions have been spent on land conservation but too little attention had been paid to how cost-effective these investments have been. With budgets increasingly constrained, conservationists must learn to fully harness their funds to protect critical resources. Messer and Allen are pioneers in making conservation selection more successful, cost-effective, scientific, and transparent. This book introduces powerful mathematical tools available for project selection, using real-life examples and a practical step-by-step approach. Readers can readily apply these methods to their own work, accomplishing more with less by combining the individual benefits of structured decision-making, mathematical programming, and an understanding of market forces and human behavior. The authors highlight tools from conservation science, mathematics, land use planning and behavioral economics, showing how they can be combined to help protect key environmental resources. This is an invaluable volume for all students, professionals and stakeholders associated with conservation programs.

Network Governance and Large Landscape Conservation

April 2016

Patrick Bixler, Lynn Scarlett, and Matthew McKinney (guest editors)

Details

This Special Issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment explores the application of network governance to large landscape conservation. The following article comprise the issue:

  • Forging new models of natural resource governance
  • Connecting people and places: the emerging role of network governance in large landscape conservation
  • Understanding leadership in a world of shared problems: advancing network governance in large landscape conservation
  • Sustaining the useful life of network governance: life cycles and developmental challenges
  • Networks and landscapes: a framework for setting goals and evaluating performance at the large landscape scale
  • Navigating governance networks for community-based conservation
  • Network governance for large-scale natural resource conservation and the challenge of capture
Network Models and Lessons from Across the U.S.

October 2017

Texas Hill Country Conservation Network

Details

Over the past few decades, networks have emerged as a powerful and widely-used approach for advancing progress in large landscape conservation and in numerous other environmental and social issue domains. This report summarizes findings from research on networks, exploring questions such as: What is a network? Why use networks? What types of networks are being used to support conservation? And what lessons can be drawn from the experiences from other networks? The findings and information in this report are drawn from a literature review of publications, articles, and websites on networks; interviews with more than 20 network experts and practitioners from across the U.S.; and review of materials related to several examples of networks focused on conservation or other environmental issues. This report includes a brief synthesis of findings related to the key questions outlined above, as well as brief profiles of six networks in the U.S. that are focused on conservation or other environmental issues.

The MSP Tool Guide: Sixty Tools to Facilitate Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships

2017

Herman Brouwer and Jan Brouwers

Details

The MSP Tool Guide is a  companion to the MSP Guide: How to Design and Facilitate Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships. This Tool Guide offers 60 process tools serving different purposes in the facilitation of multi-stakeholder partnerships.

The tools in the guide are grouped by six purposes – connection, issue exploration and shared language, divergence, co-creation, convergence, and commitment – inspired by the work of Sam Kaner (2014) and the Rockefeller Foundation’s GATHER guide. These purposes often coincide with a particular stage of a multi-stakeholder partnership: connecting, for example, will usually happen at the start.

The Tool Guide explores in-depth 60 participatory tools for analysis, planning, and decision-making that are aimed at empowering practitioners to more effectively facilitate multi-stakeholder partnerships.

The MSP Guide: How to Design and Facilitate Multi-Stakeholder Partnerships

2015

Authors: Herman Brouwer and Jim Woodhill, with Mini Hemmati, Karen Verhoosel, and Simone van Vugt

Details

In recent years, multi-stakeholder partnerships (MSPs) have become popular for tackling the complex challenges of sustainable development. This guide provides a practical framework for the design and facilitation of these collaborative processes that work across the boundaries of business, government, civil society and science.

The guide links the underlying rationale for multi-stakeholder partnerships, with a clear four phase process model, a set of seven core principles, key ideas for facilitation and 60 participatory tools for analysis, planning and decision making.

The guide has been written for those directly involved in MSPs – as a stakeholder, leader, action researcher, facilitator or funder – to provide both the conceptual foundations and practical tools that underpin successful partnerships. What’s inside draws on the direct experience of staff from the Centre of Development Innovation (CDI), at Wageningen University & Research, in supporting MSP processes in many countries around the world. The guide also compiles the ideas and materials behind CDI’s annual three week international course on facilitating MSPs.

A Review of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives

2016

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Details

This review evaluates the purpose, goals, and scientific merits of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives program within the context of similar programs, and whether the program has resulted in measurable improvements in the health of fish, wildlife, and their habitats.

Regional Conservation Partnership Handbook

2015

Author: Bill Labich

Details

The RCP Handbook is a resource aimed at driving collaborative conservation in New England, New York, and beyond. The RCP Handbook captures the experiences of RCPs to date and outlines 10 steps identified as important to RCP success. Building upon the knowledge gained from partnerships that are part of the RCP Network, the Handbook is organized around the three fundamental stages of RCP growth (Emerging, Maturing, and Conserving).

Cultural Resources Climate Change Strategy, National Park Service

2016

Authors: Marcy Rockman, Marissa Morgan, Sonya Ziaja, George Hambrecht, and Alison Meadow.

Details

The Cultural Resources Climate Change Strategy sets out a vision and broad approach for managing impacts to and learning from cultural resources under modern climate change.

Cultural resources are our record of the human experience. Collectively, these archeological sites, cultural landscapes, ethnographic resources, museum collections, and historic buildings and structures connect one generation to the next. The National Park Service is charged with conserving cultural resources so that they may be enjoyed by future generations. Climate change is adding challenges to this role, and will continue to affect cultural resources in diverse ways. At the same time, through the tangible and intangible qualities they hold, cultural resources are also part of the solution to climate change.

Expanding Horizons: Highlights from the National Workshop on Large Landscape Conservation

2015

Authors: Brent A. Mitchell, Brenda Barrett and Tony Hiss.

Details

This report summarizes the National Workshop on Large Landscape Conservation — the first major conference on large landscape conservation in North America.  Over 650 conservation professionals came together to celebrate progress and share ideas on large-scale collaborations.  The report stresses a multi-disciplinary, networked approach to finding solutions that benefit human, wildlife, cultural and ecological health.

Scaling Up: Landscape-scale Conservation in North America

2016

Author: Brent A. Mitchell (editor)

Details

This special issue of the George Wright Forum examines past and current practice in landscape-scale conservation; a common thread is that the National Park Service (NPS) has a role in all of our examples. Articles in the issue stress the importance of working at scale and taking an expansive, landscape view. The Landscape Conservation Cooperatives are highlighted, as is the national heritage areas program. Case studies are offered on emerging landscape conservation initiatives along the Appalachian Trail and in the Chesapeake watershed, and the Network for Landscape Conservation is highlighted as well.

Conservation Almanac: Tracking Investments in Protected Lands

Active

The Trust for Public Lands

Details

The Conservation Almanac is a powerful online tool for analyzing and mapping federal, state, and local funding for land conservation. Launched in 2006 by The Trust for Public Land, conservationalmanac.org has become the go-to website for planners, journalists, conservationists, and researchers seeking to understand land conservation nationwide and in defined
regions.

Adapting to Change in the Crown of the Continent: An Ecosystem Scale Approach to Collaborative Management

2015

Authors: Melly Reuling, Shawn Johnson, Sue Higgins, Patrick Bixler, Sam Williams, and Gary Tabor

Details

This report is a primer exploring the work of the Roundtable on the Crown of the Continent. As a case study of a collaborative initiative working together in a landscape experiencing a rapid rate of change, this report draws upon the Roundtable’s stories and lessons learned in the hope of providing other diverse communities and other initiatives with hope, inspiration, and insight as they seek a path forward in a world struggling with immense change.

Planning for Connectivity: A guide to connecting and conserving wildlife within and beyond America’s national forests

2015

Authors: Jonathan Haber and Peter Nelson

Details

Planning for Connectivity is a product of the Center for Large Landscape Conservation, Defenders of Wildlife, Wildlands Network and Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative. This guide focuses on requirements established under the National Forest System land management planning rule to manage for ecological connectivity on national forest lands and facilitate connectivity on planning acrosss land ownerships. The purpose of the guide and its parent publication, Planning for Diversity, is to help people inside and outside of the Forest Service who are working on forest plan revisions navigate these complex diversity and connectivity requirements.

Landscape Conservation Collaboration: A White Paper

2018

Author: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

Details

In 2018, a working group of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, which represents North America’s state fish and wildlife agencies, developed a white paper on landscape conservation. The white paper identifies key challenges and lessons learned for landscape conservation, and emerged from the AFWA working group that was convened to examine existing landscape partnerships and their governance structures, commonalities of success, approaches, partner roles and other attributes. Beginning first at a regional level, the white paper reviews efforts in the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, and Western regions to understand key drivers, challenges, and successes for collaboration in each region. A broader discussion across regional contexts follows, and the white paper concludes by identifying opportunities and next steps.

Adapting to Climate Change: Guidance for protected area managers and planners

2016

Authors: John E. Gross, James E.M. Watson, Leigh A. Welling, and Stephen Woodley

Details

The world’s climate is changing rapidly and protected areas are an increasingly important component of national and international climate change adaptation strategies. These guidelines articulate essential elements for adaptation planning and implementation, and it describes additional resources that site managers can use right away.

Implementing Technology and Precision Conservation in the Chesapeake Bay

2012

Authors: Jeffrey Allenby and Conor Phelan

Details

In 2012, Chesapeake Conservancy, with the support of the Digital Energy and Sustainability Solutions Campaign (DESSC), explored the role that technology could play in expanding the application of precision conservation; or getting the right practices, at the right scale, at the right time, in the right place. To increase the use of these emerging landscape analysis techniques, DESSC provided the Conservancy with an additional grant to test the most promising technologies and identify how these tools could improve the capabilities of the conservation community, identify the major challenges to implementing them on a wider scale, and better understand the ability for the resulting datasets to highlight priority landscapes within the project watershed.

The Emerging Role of Technology in Precision Conservation

2012

Authors: Jeffrey Allenby and David Burke

Details

The Chesapeake Conservancy recently completed a report, funded by the Digital Energy and Sustainability Solutions Campaign, which explores the role that information and communications technology can play in guiding conservation efforts throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed and prioritizing the protection and restoration of the region’s most valuable ecosystems. The report, entitled “The Emerging Role of Technology in Precision Conservation,” highlights new cost-effective technologies that can rapidly and accurately determine high-functioning natural landscapes that have the greatest potential for maintaining or improving the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay.

Strategic Conservation Planning

July 2015

Author: Ole Amundsen

Details

Strategic Conservation Planning will help you visualize a future for your community and chart a course to realize that vision. Because your actions today will determine the parks, working farms, forests and scenic landscapes your children and grandchildren will enjoy, it pays to be careful in how you use your resources to ensure you save the right land. Strategic Conservation Planning provides you with the process and tools to identify, prioritize, pursue and protect the land that will most effectively and efficiently achieve your conservation mission.

 

Enhancing the Partnership: Chesapeake Large Landscape Conservation Partnership Report

November 2013

Authors: Catherine Herbert, Phillip Olaleye, and the NPS Chesapeake Bay Office

Details

This report was developed to explore options for strengthening the Chesapeake Large Landscape Conservation Partnership (subsequently renamed the Chesapeake Conservation Partnership). Released in 2013, this report analyzes the progress of the Partnership, and offers a set of researched options and recommendations for moving the collaborative forward. Importantly, these options and recommendations are based on a detailed exploration of 14 existing models of collaborative landscape conservation initiatives from across the country. Out of the exploration of these existing models of landscape conservation emerge a set of 25 best practices for landscape conservation partnerships, with the best practices classified and organized under the following categories: Partnership Building; Institutional Framework; Financial Management; Implementation of Shared Activities; and External Communications. As such, this report is broadly relevant and applicable to landscape conservation practitioners working on initiatives and in landscapes across geographical contexts.

Building a Large Landscape Conservation Community of Practice: A Lincoln Institute of Land Policy Working Paper

February 2017

Author: Shawn Johnson

Details

Over the past seven years—starting with the first policy dialogue at the Lincoln House in 2009— a Joint Program between the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy and the Center for Natural Resources & Environmental Policy at the University of Montana has played a leading role in exploring and advancing large landscape conservation as an important framework for addressing some of the most critical land and water issues facing people and nature. This working paper summarizes key elements of this work, including: (1) insights gained through policy discussions, surveys, and publications, (2) creation of a network of large landscape conservation practitioners to build and share knowledge on large landscape conservation (currently transitioning in name from the “Practitioners’ Network for Large Landscape Conservation” to the “Network for Landscape Conservation”); and (3) efforts to collect and share information and tools developed by partners and others in support of large landscape conservation.

Wildlife Connectivity: Fundamentals for Conservation Action

2014

Authors: Rob Ament, R. Callahan, M. McClure, M. Reuling, & G. Tabor

Details

Published by the Center for Large Landscape Conservation, this report is a primer for practitioners working to advance wildlife corridor and ecological connectivity conservation. This report is intended to provide a high-level summary of the fundamentals of wildlife corridors and ecological connectivity to people engaged in management and conservation actions. We clarify the terms used to describe connectivity and provide tangible examples of different kinds of corridors and linkages and how they work. We describe the many different ways to identify places on the landscape for connectivity and wildlife corridors, including a wide range of methods, tools, and models. Finally, because policy is critical to support conservation efforts and ensure their longevity, we provide examples of existing policies that support wildlife corridors and connectivity and how they can be replicated or expanded to other jurisdictions.

Sustaining Large Landscape Conservation Partnerships: Strategies for Success

June 2012

Authors: The Sonoran Institute and the Bureau of Land Management

Details

In 2010, the Bureau of Land Management and the Sonoran Institute convened a workshop to examine trends in collaboration and community-based land management planning. This booklet shares the hard-won experience of the workshop participants, and other stories from the field, and highlights key principles for developing and sustaining landscape-scale collaborative efforts. Whether you are just starting out or have a more developed partnership, we hope that these principles and stories are helpful to you as a practitioner of large landscape conservation partnerships.

Scaling Up: Collaborative Approaches to Large Landscape Conservation

2014

National Park Service

Details

A collection of brief stories from the National Park Service that demonstrates NPS’s efforts across a wide variety of parks, programs, and initiatives that advance collaborative conservation on a landscape scale.

Regional Planning for a Sustainable America: How Creative Programs are Creating Prosperity and Saving the Environment

2011

Editor: Carl Montgomery

Details

Regional Planning for a Sustainable America is the first book to represent the great variety of today’s effective regional planning programs, analyzing dozens of regional initiatives across North America.

The American landscape is being transformed by poorly designed, sprawling development. This sprawl–and its wasteful resource use, traffic, and pollution–does not respect arbitrary political boundaries like city limits and state borders. Yet for most of the nation, the patterns of development and conservation are shaped by fragmented, parochial local governments and property developers focused on short-term economic gain. Regional planning provides a solution, a means to manage human impacts on a large geographic scale that better matches the natural and economic forces at work. By bringing together the expertise of forty-two practitioners and academics, this book provides a practical guide to the key strategies that regional planners are using to achieve truly sustainable growth.

It takes a network to tackle growth and complexity

October 2016

Authors: R. Patrick Bixler, Clare Zutz, and Ashley Lovell

Details

In an October 2016 article in the Stanford Social Innovation Review, the authors highlight social network analysis as an analytic tool to measure social interactions and relationships, and to visualize the nature, distribution, and structure of connections between individuals and organizations. The work highlighted in the article is centered on regional conservation efforts in the Texas Hill Country.

Assessing the State of Landscape Conservation Initiatives in North America: A Survey and Report

March 2018

Authors: Network for Landscape Conservation

Details

In 2017, the Network for Landscape Conservation conducted an in-depth survey of North American landscape conservation initiatives to develop a baseline of data on the practice across geographies. The survey was developed to understand the prevalence of landscape conservation efforts, and to understand trends in initiative structure and governance, focus and/or emphasis, strategies and actions, performance and evaluation, and the extent of dialogue and exchange across initiatives. This summary report synthesizes the data collected from 130 responding landscape conservation initiatives to bring into focus the current development of the landscape conservation field.

Large Landscape Conservation in the Rocky Mountain West

February 2013

Authors: Matthew McKinney and Shawn Johnson

Details

This inventory and status report explores the emergence of landscape conservation initiatives in the Rocky Mountain West. The report clarifies who is doing what with respect to landscape conservation in the region, and draws insights out of an analysis of the inventory data. The report is intended to promote, support, and advance landscape conservation throughout the Rocky Mountain West.

New Policies with the Potential to Improve Wildlife Corridors and Ecological Connectivity

May 2016

Author: Robert Ament

Details

This report is a compilation of federal and state policies that have direct or indirect implications for wildlife corridors and ecological connectivity conservation. It is a continuation of new federal policies that were first reported in 2012, The Obama Administration’s Progress on Federal Policies for Wildlife Corridors and Ecological Connectivity Conservation: January 2009 through December 2012 (online at: http://largelandscapes.org/media/publications/Obama-Admin–Progress-on-Federal-Policies-for-Wildlife- Corridors2.pdf). This report provides a broad set of policy-setting activities, such as legislation, executive orders, secretarial orders, strategies, and memoranda, by the executive or legislative branches of state or federal governments.

Landscapes: Improving Conservation Practice in the Northeast Megaregion

February 2012

Authors: Regional Plan Association and America 2050

Details

Buying land isn’t enough. Building parks won’t get it done. Restoring forests and wetlands by themselves is not an answer. Successful conservation requires a compre- hensive, regional approach.

Landscape conservation means looking beyond property boundaries and political jurisdictions. A holistic perspective is vital
for managing watersheds and habitats and addressing long-term issues such as climate change. With funding scarce, it’s also crucial to build partnerships that can set mutual priorities, share resources and collaborate e ectively. As the population grows and development expands, conservation needs to help shape – and not simply react to – deci- sions about land use and urban infrastructure.

is is especially true for complex geogra- phies like the 13-state Northeast megaregion. is densely developed area – stretching from Maine to West Virginia – is now home to about 72 million people. Its cities, suburbs and rural areas are expected to add an addi- tional 15 million people by the year 2040. Where these people are housed, and how their transportation and energy needs are met, will dictate whether the region’s wildlife, drinking water and other resources, farms and forests, and outdoor recreational opportuni- ties are truly lasting.

Healthy Landscapes, Healthy People: A Guidebook for Montana Communities Preparing for a Changing Climate.

2018

Authors: Libby Khumalo and Grace Stonecipher

Details

This guidebook was prepared for the 2018 Montana Faith, Science, and Climate Action conference, and is intended to serve as a guide for people who are concerned about human health and climate change. The guide is framed through a landscape perspective, focusing attention on why landscapes are important and how they relate to human health. Through grounded in a specific geographical context, the framing perspective of protecting landscapes is relevant and applicable across all contexts, and the recommendations around planning and communicating about the intersection of landscape, human health, and climate change likewise are broadly relevant.

Working across All Lands

May 2016

Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition

Details

A Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition issue paper explores the emerging notion of an “all lands, all hands” collaborative approach to natural resources management in the rural west.

All Lands Management: The Role of Policy, Practice and Peer Learning

2017

Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition

Details

This issue paper presented by the Rural Voices for Conservation Coalition highlights the importance of working across public and private boundaries for addressing the ecological and economic challenges facing the rural West.

Protecting Nature: Landscape Scale Conservation in the United States

February 2015

Presenter: Peter Howell

Details

In this webinar, Peter Howell discusses his work at the Open Space Institute, a conservation organization that focuses on landscape scale conservation throughout the Eastern United States. Through recent projects spearheaded by OSI, Howell illustrates the challenges and opportunities that landscape-scale conservation presents, and shares his insight on current trends regarding conservation in the United States.

Presented as part of the Yale Center for Business and the Environment “Nature’s Returns: Investing in Ecosystem Services” webinar series.

Report on the Conservation Leadership Dialogue on the Future of Large Landscape Conservation in America

May 2011

Authors: James N. Levitt and Charles C. Chester

Details

This report on the 2011 Conservation Leadership Dialogue on The Future of Large Landscape Conservation in America was produced based on a one-day meeting of invited guests at the Members of Congress Room in the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. The event was a program of the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and partner organizations, including the Center for Natural Resource and Environmental Policy at the University of Montana, based in Missoula, Montana; the Regional Plan Association, based in New York, New York, and the Sonoran Institute, based in Tucson, Arizona.

LCC Network Conservation Science Plan

November 2015

Landscape Conservation Cooperative Network

Details

The LCC Network Conservation Science Plan (Science Plan) advances a strategic conservation framework to identify and describe the common science and technical priorities and practices that transcend individual LCC geographies and support the LCC Network’s vision and mission. The intent of this document is to add value to individual efforts, while also providing mechanisms for aligning such efforts across multiple spatial scales. While the document is framed by and written for Landscape Conservation Cooperatives, many of its principles and insights are widely applicable across all landscape conservation initiatives.

Connectivity Tool Decision Guide

2017

Conservation Corridor

Details

A web-based decision support guide managed by Conservation Corridor. Are you looking for a tool or program to help you design, implement, and/or manage corridors and connectivity in the landscape? Our Connectivity Tool Decision Guide is aimed at guiding you towards the most appropriate tool to use for your specific project.

It is often the case that multiple tools are needed to more accurately address your questions, so it may be beneficial to work through the Decision Guide more than once. Keep in mind that this is meant to be only a suggestion, and finding the most appropriate tool(s) to use is often determined by multiple factors that may be outside the scope of these questions.

LandVote

Active

The Trust for Public Lands

Details

Across the country, dozens of state and local governments each year vote to raise public funds in support of land conservation. The Trust For Public Land’s LandVote® Database is the premier source of information about these measures. The database brings together the most comprehensive history available for conservation finance measures that have been placed on the ballot.

The Language of Conservation: Updated Recommendations on How to Communicate Effectively to Build Support for Conservation

2013

David Metz and Lori Weigel

Details

The “Language of Conservation” is a memo that contains recommendations for communicating effectively to build support for conservation, and is based on a representative national survey of American voters commissioned by The Nature Conservancy in 2012 and conducted by a bi-partisan research team: Democratic polling firm Fairbank, Maslin, Maullin, Metz & Associates and Republican polling firm Public Opinion Strategies. This memo seeks to provide language and messaging recommendations in a list of easy-to-follow, broad “rules” for communication. Some of these rules reinforce long-standing communication guidelines that have been tracked over time, while others were tested to reflect today’s changed political and economic context.

Corridor Toolbox

2017

Conservation Corridor

Details

A web-based resource maintained by Conservation Corridor, this toolbox contains a catalogue of nearly 20 programs and tools for designing and working with corridors, a database of technical and peer-reviewed literature, and links to additional web-based resources.

Working Across Boundaries: People, Nature, and Regions

2009

Authors: Matthew McKinney and Shawn Johnson

Details

This book is a explores the process of working across boundaries on land use and natural resources issues. The emphasis is practical: the book serves as a guide, presents a variety of principles, techniques, strategies, and concepts to help people diagnose regional problems, design an appropriate regional forum, develop and implement regional action plans, and evaluate and adapt their regional initiatives. As such, it has become a valuable resource for citizens, practitioners, and policy makers grappling with transboundary challenges who seek guidance on the process by which regional solutions can be identified and implemented.

Potential Conservation Easement Provisions Designed to Explicitly Address Connectivity in the Northern Appalachians

2012

Staying Connected Initiative

Details

This publications puts forward sample conservation easement language designed to explicitly address issues of habitat connectivity. These provisions are intended to facilitate the drafting of connectivity language appropriate to the particular circumstances of a specific conservation easement property.

Call to Action Item #22 – Scaling Up: 2011-2016 Accomplishments Report and Next Steps

2016

Authors: Elaine F. Leslie and Kassandra Hardy

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Call to Action Item 22 “Scaling Up,” called the NPS to “Promote large landscape conservation to support healthy ecosystems and cultural resources.” This report documents accomplishments for the 5 year period from 2011 to 2016, and lays out next steps.

Conservation Biology for All

2010

Authors: Navjot S. Sodhi and Paul R. Ehrlich (editors)

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This book contains a series of authoritative chapters written by top names in conservation biology with the aim of disseminating cutting-edge conservation knowledge as widely as possible. Important topics such as balancing conversion and human needs, climate change, conservation planning, designing and analyzing conservation research, ecosystem services, endangered species management, extinctions, fire, habitat loss, and invasive species are covered. Numerous textboxes describing additional relevant material or case studies are also included.

National Conservation Easement Database

Active

Details

The National Conservation Easement Database (NCED) is the first national database of conservation easement information, compiling records from land trusts and public agencies throughout the United States. This effort helps agencies, land trusts, and other organizations plan more strategically, identify opportunities for collaboration, advance public accountability, and raise the profile of what’s happening on-the-ground in the name of conservation.

Landscape-Scale Conservation: Grappling with the Green Matrix

January 2004

Author: James Levitt

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This article is a summary of the 2003 Conservation Leadership Dialogue hosted by the Lincoln Institute for Land Policy and partners. The purposes of the two-day conference were: to advance our emerging understanding of what, in concept, landscape-scale initiatives are, and why they may be necessary; to better understand how such concepts are (or are not) being realized in the field; and to identify which innovations and advances appear necessary to more fully realize such large and comprehensive initiatives.

Conservation in North America: An Analysis of Land-based Conservation in Canada, Mexico, and the United States by NAWPA Agencies

2016

The North American Intergovernmental Committee on Cooperation for Wilderness and Protected Area Conservation

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Conservation Practice at the Landscape Scale

2005

Authors: Daniel N. Laven, Nora J. Mitchell, and Deane Wang (editors)

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This thematic issue of the George Wright Forum explores the complexity, multiple benefits, and urgent challenges of landscape-scale conservation, while also identifying a wide range of elements that contribute to success. The issue describes a number of large-scale conservation initiatives. Five case studies are included, ranging from cross-international boundary work in the northern Appalachians and the Rockies to the conservation efforts of the regional watershed of the Potomac; and from the cultural heritage of America’s distinctive regional landscapes to the biodiversity of the Brazilian Atlantic forest.

Landscape Connectivity: A Call to Action

March 2017

World Business Council for Sustainable Development

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Creating landscapes with healthy, functioning ecosystems is not only key to making progress towards the environmental targets embedded in the Sustainable Development Goals, but also to addressing multiple social and economic targets that depend partly or wholly on the bene ts that ecosystems provide to people.

The Science of Open Spaces: Theory and Practice for Conserving Large Complex Systems

July 2015

Author: Charles G. Curtin

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From the days of the American Frontier, the term “open spaces” has evoked a vision of unspoiled landscapes stretching endlessly toward the horizon, of nature operating on its own terms without significant human interference. Ever since, government agencies, academia, and conservation organizations have promoted policies that treat large, complex systems with a one-size-fits-all mentality that fails to account for equally complex social dimensions of humans on the landscape. This is wrong, argues landscape ecologist and researcher Charles Curtin. We need a science-based approach that tells us how to think about our large landscapes and open spaces at temporally and spatially appropriate scales in a way that allows local landowners and other stakeholders a say in their futures.

The Science of Open Spaces turns conventional conservation paradigms on their heads, proposing that in thinking about complex natural systems, whether the arid spaces of the southwestern United States or open seas shared by multiple nations, we must go back to “first principles”–those fundamental physical laws of the universe–and build innovative conservation from the ground up based on theory and backed up by practical experience. Curtin walks us through such foundational science concepts as thermodynamics, ecology, sociology, and resilience theory, applying them to real-world examples from years he has spent designing large-scale, place-based collaborative research programs in the United States and around the world.

Compelling for not only theorists and students, but also practitioners, agency personnel, and lay readers, this book offers a thoughtful and radical departure from business-as-usual management of Earth’s dwindling wide-open spaces.

America’s Working Lands: Farm Bill Programs and Landscape-scale Conservation

2011

Author: Lynn Scarlett

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Affirming the substantial national conservation and ecosystem benefits associated with farmlands, ranchlands, and forests, every Farm Bill since 1985 has included a section dedicated to conservation programs. During each five-year reauthorization cycle, the Farm Bill conservation provisions undergo scrutiny regarding funding, structure, goals, program effectiveness, and geographic emphasis.

This White Paper examines Farm Bill conservation programs through a large landscape conservation lens and addresses four questions: (1) how does current implementation of Farm Bill conservation programs support landscape-scale conservation? (2) what Farm Bill conservation tools are particularly useful in supporting landscape-scale conservation? (3) what challenges or barriers limit the potential of Farm Bill conservation programs to support landscape-scale conservation?; and (4) what Farm Bill conservation program administrative and legislative measures might enhance large-landscape conservation?

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